How These Prodigious Adolescent Siblings Developed A Mobile Browser

By  |  August 23, 2018

It has been almost three years now since teenage brothers Osine and Anesi spurred awe, accolades, and inspiration in the Nigerian tech ecosystem. Defying the laws of age and the excesses that come with it, these adolescent siblings became part of what is now known as a historical replay in technology and innovation. Revered as two brothers who have all the makings of the next Steve Jobs or Mark Zuckerberg, these kids developed an Android web browser they called Crocodile Browser Lite. This app which was said to have nearly all the features the present Chrome has, was well received and reviewed on Google Play store.

This free browser was described as “Initiative Clean and Fast” for low-end phones, which as at 2015 had 40 K downloads. Funnily, Osine and Anesi said they decided to create this application because they were fed up with Google Chrome. The duo took an interest in tech and communication at very tender ages. Osine’s interest in computer started at age seven and Anesi’s at nine, during which time they nurtured the idea of starting a company. As the time passed, both brothers self-taught and wrote code, and Anesi was a user interface designer. Synergizing, the duo eventually started a company they christened to be BluDoors. Inspired by “Windows,” they initially named the company Doors, but they quickly changed it to BluDoors when they found out the name had already been taken.

According to Anesi, who was born on June 1, 1999, he started learning to code himself in 2013, when he used sites like Code Academy, Code Avengers, and books such as Android For Game Development and Game For Dummies. Meanwhile, Osine just had a remarkable knack for computers right from the day he could use one. Basically, Osine writes codes, and his brother designs them. They were just like every other boy their age, as they too played soccer, but set themselves apart with their unquenchable learning hunger. Osine, who was born on April 28, 2001, takes coding as a hobby, even in the face of dissuasion from his uncle that going down such path would be a tough one.

In what was as a result of boredom, these two tech fevers created and launched the mobile browser on the Mobango app store before moving on to Google Play store in a bid to reach out to a broader audience. There were at the time students of Greensprings School, Anthony Campus in Lagos, in which they became very popular after being recognized and interviewed by media powerhouse in Nigeria. The mother of these siblings, who is a math teacher, reported that Osine already knew his way around a PC before he could read, at age 3. According to her, since he learned to code, all the kid does is code. Mrs. Ngozi Ikhianosime also disclosed that the boys’ school played an important role in teaching them to code at young a young age, as the school provided students with computer access and internet facilities, coupled with personal laptops at home with which they honed their prodigious skills.

According to her, Anesi who was in his final year at the time would attend A-levels when he’s done with school, after which he would go to Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston for his first degree because the school had everything need in place for him to learn properly. The father of the boys, Mr. Philip Ikhianosime, who was the Head of Management Services and Human Resource Manager at an Insurance company, said his sons developed an early interest in PC and agreed too that their school was instrumental in their continued programming interest.

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Osine and Anesi, after days, weeks and months of coding and designing have earned a place for themselves in the young entrepreneurship hall of fame, and their brainchild, Crocodile Lite, will not be forgotten so quickly. Users reported that the mobile application was unlike any other, with a fast load speed, no extra bells or whistles, and continuous tab runs.  

 

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